In April – May 2015, PROVINCE (Anne-Louise Dadak/Laura Pike) were artists in residence for The Motion Room. They were interested to know how local people moved around the area, their connection to it, and what they thought could improve the quality of life in 2168.

Local residents joined them at the Food Court of the Miller Shopping Centre and traced their regular movements. Here’s what PROVINCE did with that information. You can see that some people roam far and wide, and others move in a small area.

Access to a car is a big determinant in how freely local people can move. If people are reliant on walking or on public transport, their worlds are smaller.

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Alison

As part of The Motion Room Artists in Residency program, artist Katie Green worked with local women to produce 2168 SHORTS, a program of short films that show 2168 through their eyes.

If you would like to make a film with us, get in touch with us at hello@themotionroom.net.au or drop in to see us.

Alison has lived all her life in 2168 and is passionate about local history. She remembers its earlier street-level village feeling, the local pool and milk bar and Green Valley motorway, all way before housing developments and Westfield. She’s also committed to her study in Community Services, especially catering to women. She has a daughter that she hopes will enjoy her life in the area as much as she has.

“Liverpool has changed so much. Back in the day there was no Westfield, there was just a small shopping complex. But now it’s like huge, and it’s more social. People look forward to coming into Liverpool, doing their shopping.”

“I love where I live. It’s home for me, and it takes me back to my childhood. There’s a saying: ‘you can take the girl out of the valley but you can’t take the valley out of the girl’.

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Afaf

As part of The Motion Room Artists in Residency program, artist Katie Green worked with local women to produce 2168 SHORTS, a program of short films that show 2168 through their eyes.

If you would like to make a film with us, get in touch with us at hello@themotionroom.net.au or drop in to see us.

The films will be screened at a community BBQ later this month (April 2015), with a date to be announced very shortly.

Afaf, originally from Saudi Arabia, is quite new to the 2168 area. After fifteen years raising five children, she has gone back to finishing her Bachelor in Psychology.

She had been alerted to the stigma of 2168 as a place to live and raise children but has not found the stereotypes to be more valid than the other space or places she’s experienced.

“Tell me a story about any culture,” she says. “Is it true? Because 99% of the time it’s not true.”

Afaf is mindful of the need for people to connect. “We came from different parts of the world so we need to meet and talk and find out our challenges, our problems, and try together to solve it, because each culture alone, we can’t do that”.

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Rosheen

As part of The Motion Room Artists in Residency program, artist Katie Green worked with local women to produce 2168 SHORTS, a program of short films that show 2168 through their eyes.

If you would like to make a film with us, get in touch with us at hello@themotionroom.net.au or drop in to see us.

The films will be screened at a community BBQ later this month (April 2015), with a date to be announced very shortly.

Rosheen is an Aboriginal woman who grew up in this area, left in her late teens and eventually returned to live. In this 2168 SHORTS film, she reflects on her early local experience as a child, where the community were either white Australians or Aboriginal Australians.

The gradual increase of migrants from other parts of the world, mostly Italians and Greeks initially, saw a new target for racism: they were uniformly called ‘wogs’.

Rosheen remembers the role of laneways in everyday life, before they became ‘problematic’.

“I don’t remember a lot of people having cars and laneways were the way to the shop, they were the way to Miller shops, basically, or the way to a friend’s house, so they connected you to one house or street to another”.

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Aia

As part of The Motion Room Artists in Residency program, artist Katie Green worked with local women to produce 2168 SHORTS, a program of short films that show 2168 through their eyes.

If you would like to make a film with us, get in touch with us at hello@themotionroom.net.au or drop in to see us.

The films will be screened at a community BBQ later this month (April 2015), with a date to be announced very shortly.

Aia lives in 2168 and is the mother of six children. Born and raised in Samoa, she loves this area and its people, and is passionate about food and cooking. She sees great riches in the multi-ethnicity, personal space and local art of Miller, and is surprised about the misconception that Miller is a bad place.

She really admires the Aboriginal people of Miller and feels welcomed by their regular gathering at “The Wall” in Miller Square. She says, “People used to sit and they’re just enjoying their sitting; they’re relaxing and watching people walk by.”

Recently The Wall was demolished, but the Aboriginal people are still gathering in Miller Square.

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